Pain Connection Newsletter header
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We thank the following businesses for donating goods/services to help raise funds for our programs:

  • WASHINGTON WIZARDS
  • BALTIMORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
  • MARRAKESH RESTAURANT
  • THE MARYLAND JOCKEY CLUB
  • GETTYSBURG CONVENTION & VISITORS CENTER, PA.
  • FRIENDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOO
  • ANNAPOLIS HARBOR QUEEN WATERMARK CRUISES
  • GOOD EARTH NURSERY
  • AS KINDRED SPIRITS
  • MASSUAGE ASSOCIATES, LEE ANN BLANK
  • SENECA WELLNESS & FITNESS CENTER
  • ALPHAGRAPHICS
  • RITZ CAMERA CENTERS
  • JOHNSON'S FLORIST & GARDEN CENTERS
  • PANERA BREAD
  • ULTA COSMETIC
  • STROSNIDERS HARDWARE

Tips for Dealing with People in Chronic Pain

By Dennis James Capolongo (Group member)

1) People with chronic pain may appear to be unreliable. When we are feeling better, we promise things (and mean it); but when in serious pain, we may not be able to follow through on what we so very much wish we can do. We find it difficult to count on ourselves at times, but it doesn't mean we wish it to be this way.

2) An action or situation may result in pain several hours later, or even the next day. Delayed pain is confusing to people who have never experienced it.

3) Pain can inhibit listening or distract from other communication skills. Imagine trying to talk over a fire alarm or having a productive conversation while people are shouting in the background? The effect of constant pain on the mind can mimic an attention deficit disorder because of the constant distraction the pain causes. So you may have to repeat a request, or write things down for a person living in chronic pain. Please don't take it personally, or think that they are stupid or careless.

4) The senses can easily become overloaded while living with pain. For example, noises or stressful arguments that wouldn't normally bother you can be overwhelming for someone in chronic pain.

5) Patience may seem short with those who live in pain. We can be misinterpreted as being rude and impolite at times. We find it difficult to keep sharply focused on what we are saying so it can be hard to tolerate long drawn out conversation or fun debates. We do wish to participate and enjoy your company, but sometimes we may not be able to.

6) When we are asked, "How are you doing?", be genuinely prepared to listen to a horrific response because otherwise we must deny the truth to you about our daily lives. That question can mix up the emotional knots that we keep locked up inside as we learn to hide, tolerate and live with our pain.

7)Pain can sometimes trigger physical or psychological disabilities. When in pain, a small task like doing the laundry can seem like a huge wall too high to climb at that time. But in an hour or so, the same job may be quite possible! It is sane to be depressed occasionally when you constantly hurt. We sometimes simply require more time to get it under control.

8) Pain can come on fairly quickly and unexpectedly. Pain sometimes abates after a short rest. People who live with chronic pain appear to arrive and fade unpredictably to others.

9) Knowing that there is a refuge, such as a couch, a bed, or a comfortable chair, is as important as knowing where the bathroom is to people living with chronic pain. A welcomed trip is much more enjoyable if there is indeed a refuge they can escape to if and when needed. It's understandable if a person in chronic pain may not wish to go somewhere that has no refuge.

10) Small acts of kindness can seem like huge acts of compassion to a person suffering from chronic pain. Your offer of a pillow, a cup of tea, or simply a gentle hug can really be the high point to a person who is feeling temporarily helpless, depressed or withdrawn when pain comes knocking.

11) Not all pain is easy to locate or describe. Sometimes there is a body-wide feeling of discomfort, with hard to describe pains in the entire back, or in both legs, hands, feet, neck and/or shoulders. It's hard sometimes to pinpoint one particular spot. It's as if it had a will of its own! Our vocabulary for pain is very limited compared to the body's ability to feel varieties of discomfort.

12) We may not have a good "reason", or a genuine diagnosis for the pain we endure. Medical science is still limited in its understanding of chronic pain and it's many triggering devices. There are many people who live in pain that have not yet been classified by doctors as having an officially recognized "disease". That does not reduce the pain they must endure every day of their lives, it only reduces their ability to give it a label so as to make it easier for you to believe them.


Pain Connection's Wish List

  • Premises for our center that will be handicapped accessible.
  • Fundraisers and Volunteers to develop events.
  • Journalist willing to help with publishing our newsletter.

Remembrance

A donation was made by the Baldwin Family in honor of their 'father, Pop Pop', Lee Hausman.


Support Group Dates

Montgomery County Support Group Dates - Thursdays
*December 2, 2004, *January 6, 2005, **February 3, **March 3, **April 7
Location:
*Davis Library 6400 Democracy Blvd, Bethesda, MD
**Twinbrook Library, 202 Meadow Hall Dr., Rockville, MD
Time: 11:00-12:30 PM.
New Saturday Guest Speakers Series
December 18, 2004 - Dave Schoof, Meditation Teacher
Location: Good Shepherd Church Of The Brethren, 3701 Spruell Drive Silver Spring, Maryland
Time: 11-12:30 PM

Prince George's County Support Group Dates - Wednesdays
December 9, 2004, **January 12, 2005, **February 9, **March 9, **April 13
Location: Greenbelt Library 11 Crescent Road, Greenbelt, MD
Time: 11:30AM - 1:00PM Parking and entrance at the back ** Starting in January at Rexford Place, 9885 Greenbelt Rd., Lanham, MD
NEW Time: 1:30PM - 3:30PM
Washington DC Support Group Dates - Wednesdays
December 15, 2004, January 19, 2005, February 16, March 16, April 20
Location: American Cancer Society (Universal North entrance), Suite 730 1875 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20009
Time: 12-1:30 pm


Anne Arundel County Support Group
December 11, 2004, January 8, 2005, February 12, March 12, April 9
Location: In Good Health Lifestyle Center, 135 Old Solomons Island Road Annapolis, Md 21401
Time: 2-3:30 pm
Call: 410-897-9070

FOR YOUR COMFORT BRING YOUR PILLOWS, MATS, ICE OR HOT PACKS!

UPDATES

** We are currently recruiting interested community members to join our board of directors. We need people who are willing to help develop our programs, raise funds and promote our mission. Please contact our office if you are interested or can recommend someone.**

The Silver Springs Speakers Series which began in July has brought us educational speakers discussing different ways of coping and healing with chronic pain. Dr. Rifkin, Chiropractor, Pain Management; Mary Anne Blank, Massage Therapist; Linda Kuserk, Physical Therapist, Ergonomics and Gwenn Herman, Psychotherapist, Depression and Chronic Pain. We thank the Good Shepherd Church Of The Brethren for allowing us to use their facilities for our groups.

The Anne Arundel support group started in August in Annapolis and is being led by Linda Girdner and Laura Shannahan.

Pain Connection had a booth exhibit at the Governor's Conference on Vital Aging held at The Inn and Conference Center at the University of Maryland on November 5th. Many contacts were made with other community agencies, medical and mental health professionals and community members. There were numerous requests for support groups to be started in several counties in Maryland. Repeatedly we told each person as soon as we receive funding


Designated Founders of Pain Connection for Contributions of $100 and over....

  • Robin Sandenburgh
  • Seneca Physical Therapy, Inc.
  • Baldwin Family
  • Kim & Audrey Richeson
  • Susan Swanson
  • Koonz, McKenney, Johnson,
  • DePaolis & Lightfoot
  • Kyle Keese
  • Josephine Shepard

WE THANK YOU!


YOU CAN NOW DONATE ONLINE !

WITH YOUR CREDIT CARD GO TO OUR DONATION PAGE. PRESS THE "NETWORK FOR GOOD" LOGO WHICH IS A SECURE SERVICE AND MAKE YOUR GENEROUS DONATION TODAY.
OUR UNITED WAY NATIONAL CAPITOL AREA CAMPAIGN DESIGNATION NUMBER IS #9234.PLEASE DESIGNATE US ON YOUR DONOR CARD AT WORK OR WHEN MAKING A DONATION! TELL YOUR FAMILY, FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS

Volunteer Thanks to:

Ivymount School students and Sterling Fennel; Jean Shollenberger for phone contacts; and Kyle Keese for developing Power Point Presentation.

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PAIN CONNECTION®-CHRONIC PAIN OUTREACH CENTER INC.
12320 Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD 20852

© 2004 Pain Connection®-Chronic Pain Outreach Center, Inc. All Rights Reserved.



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PAIN CONNECTION®-CHRONIC PAIN OUTREACH CENTER INC.
12320 Parklawn Drive, Rockville, MD 20852
phone: 301-231-0008    fax: 800-910-6951     info@painconnection.org